Monday, March 23, 2015

Are You Confused About the Right Way to Handle Dandruff?


woman burying hands against her face.jpeg
As upsetting as dandruff can be, it can be corrected simply enough. All it takes is understanding the condition and taking the proper steps.


Dandruff can be an embarrassing problem.  This condition happens because the skin on your scalp is constantly renewing itself and shedding.   It is when those dead cells become trapped and mix with hair oil that it triggers the yeast-like fungus known as
malassezia, causing seborrheic dermatitis.
Before you rush to the drug store, you need to figure out if you have a true case of actual dandruff or just a side effect from styling products.  Making that determination is easy because real dandruff is white and a thicker texture than the clearer variety of what may fall to your shoulders from products.  

If you find those styling products are the probable cause, trying a clarifying shampoo could help.  Then again, you could have an allergy from anything in your hair products, especially fragrance that cause that contact dermatitis and dandruff.  Switching to a non-scented line or just a different brand of hair care product could simply fix this.  Actual dandruff needs active ingredients in the shampoo to be effective.  

If you were planning on also coloring your hair, you should keep the following in mind. Dandruff can also become more severe since the chemicals in hair color can effect the scalp’s healthy bacteria.  A better idea is to try to rectify the condition first.

The real trick when considering a dandruff shampoo formula is figuring out which dandruff ingredients can best work for the severity of your problem.  If you have severe dandruff and non-colored treated hair, look for selenium sulfide and ketoconazole.  Look for ones with coal tar when there is lots of flaking involved.   

Those with milder dandruff would be happier with zinc pyrithione, salicylic acids, or a natural antifungal agent like tea tree oil over the stronger  formulations that can overly dry the hair.

Remember that if you don’t see any progress after several weeks of using those dandruff shampoos, you should make an appointment with a dermatologist.

Fortunately, those white flakes tend to improve somewhat in the summer because sun exposure is capable of inhibiting the fungus responsible.  

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